A tie is a perfect clothing item that can speak a thousand words about you. Luckily, there’s a wide variety of them out there for you to try. If you’re interested in knowing how to tie a tie, you’re in for a treat. In the following article, you’ll find a step by step guide for 10 of the most popular and elegant ties around. Whether you’re having an important business meeting or you’re looking for ways to up your tie game, this guide will show you how to tie a tie in simple and easy steps!

How to Tie a TieHow to Tie a Tie

How to Tie a Simple Knot

As the name suggests, the simple knot is one of the easiest ties to learn with a few steps. It’s also known as the “Oriental knot” or “Petit Noeud”. Despite being easy, it’s not the most common tie in America and Europe. However, it still has its glamor in the east.

The knot is characterized by its compactness and the asymmetry that makes it lean forward. Simple knots give extra length to the ties, so it works well with tall people who need that little extra.

Here’s how you can tie a simple knot:

  1. Start by draping the tie around your neck, with the backside of the tie facing away from you, and the seam is facing outwards.
  2. Keep the thick end of the tie on your left, and lower it 2 or 3 inches below the desired end position.
  3. Hold the wide end, and move it horizontally across the front of the narrow end.
  4. Pass the wide end horizontally under the front of the narrow again.
  5. Repeat the previous step by crossing the wide end again though the formed knot from left to right.
  6. Pass the wide end across the knot from right to left forming a loop by keeping your fingertip under the third horizontal turn.
  7. Bring the tip of the wide end under the loop you’ve created.
  8. Feed the tie all the way behind the knot, and down over through the loop you formed in step 6.
  9. Pull the narrow end down, then adjust the tie by holding the knot gently while pulling the two ends together.

How to Tie a Windsor Knot

The Windsor knot is one of the most popular knots around. It’s also referred to as “Full Windsor” and “Double Windsor” knots.

In fact, the Windsor knot was invented by the public as a way to imitate the Duke of Windsor’s tie, who didn’t actually wear a Windsor knot! Instead, he wore a Four-in-Hand with custom-made thick ties. (but more on the Four-in-Hand later)

It’s characterized by its large symmetric triangular shape. This makes it ideal for men with large necks and widespread collars.

Before heading into the steps, you should know that the Windsor knot needs a tie with extra length. The knot is large with double folds, so this will give a natural length in the end. Any tie that measures between 60 to 65 inches should do.

Here’s how to tie it:

  1. Drape the tie around your collar.
  2. Start with the wide end of the tie on your right, and the narrow end on your left.
  3. Adjust the tie so that the wide end is about 4 to 6 inches below your waistband. The smaller end should be slightly above the belly button.
  4. Make an “X” shape below your chin level by crossing the two ends. The large end is in front of the small one forming a loop around the neck.
  5. Use one finger to hold the X part in place, and tuck the wide end into the neck loop from beneath then upwards from exactly behind the X part.
  6. Pull the wide end back all the way down over the X.
  7. Take the wide end and pass it behind the knot horizontally from left to right.
  8. Mirror the previous step by flipping the wide end, and tug it diagonally from upper right to lower left.
  9. Bring the wide end up to the center knot, and all the way up from the front of the knot.
  10. Pass the wide end through the neck loop and back down.
  11. Hold the knot in place by a fingertip, and pass the wide end across the front knot from right to left horizontally.
  12. Bring the wide end up into the neck loop from underneath to form a necktie.
  13. Tug the wide end of the necktie into the necktie loop you’ve just created.
  14. Tighten the tie by holding the Windsor knot with index and thumb gently, and pulling down the wide end only for adjustment.

How to Tie a Half Windsor

If you love the Windsor knot look but you’re hoping for a slightly easier version, the Half Windsor knot should be on your list.

A lot of young men start learning to tie a tie through the half Windsor. Despite the name, it has more than 80% resemblance to the Full Windsor knot.

Similar to the Full Windsor, this one is a relatively large knot. However, it doesn’t need an extra-long tie. This makes it excellent for tall and broad men that don’t have an extra-long tie lying around.

Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Drape the necktie around your collar with the wide end on the right and the narrow end on the left.
  2. Adjust the tie so that the wide end is about halfway to your thighs and the smaller end at about the level of your stomach.
  3. Similar to the Windsor knot, make an “X” shape below your chin level. Cross the two ends where the large end is in front of the small one forming a loop around the neck.
  4. Hold the wide end of the tie, and bring it around the narrow end from the behind.
  5. While holding the “X”, pull the wide end towards the center where the “X” is formed.
  6. Take the wide end again, and pass it through the neck loop then down all the way tightly towards the left.
  7. Bring the wide end over the formed knot from the front horizontally from side to side.
  8. Once again, pass the wide end through the neck loop from beneath.
  9. Bring the wide end down through the neck loop you’ve created in step 7.
  10. Tighten the tie by holding the knot gently with index and thumb, and pulling down the wide end while pulling the knot up the collar.
  11. Sometimes you might also need to adjust the triangular knot to make it symmetric.

How to Tie a Four-in-Hand

The Four-in-Hand knot is one of the oldest tie knots in history. The tie is named after the horsemen club of the same name in the early 1800s.

Besides being one of the oldest, it’s also one of the most popular tie knots around. It’s very easy to learn yet it gives a versatile and elegant look to any gentleman.

Ideally, the knot is preferred for men with slim necks due to its slightly asymmetrical and slender look. It’s also known for its ease of release by one hand.

Here’s how you can ace the Four-in-Hand look:

  1. Bring a normal length tie, and drape it around your collar with the wide end on the right and the small end on the left.
  2. Adjust the tie that the wide end is about 3 to 5 inches lower than the smaller end. Make the smaller end an inch above your belly button.
  3. Make an “X” shape below your chin level by crossing the two ends where the large end is in front of the small one forming a loop around the neck.
  4. Wrap the wide end around the thin end from the behind, and cross the wide end from the right to left horizontally all the way.
  5. Cross the wide end again from the front of the small end horizontally from left to right.
  6. Slip a finger beneath the made knot to give space to create a loop above the knot.
  7. Take the wide end, and pass it through the loop around your neck from beneath.
  8. Bring the wide end down through the loop you’ve created in step 6.
  9. Pull the wide end down all the way while holding the tie knot gently.
  10. Tighten the knot by pulling it up simultaneously then adjust it as needed.

Also Read: How to Measure Sleeve Length

How to Tie a Pratt Knot (Shelby Knot)

The Pratt knot is one of the uncommon ties that have a magical elegance hidden within its simplicity and uneven look.

It was created by Mr. Jerry Pratt, who worked in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in the 70s and 80s. It came to the public attention after the anchorman Don Shelby showed up with his discovery on National television in the late 80s. That’s why they’re also known as “Shelby Knot”

The knot has an average size that counts as a middle point between the Four-in-Hand and the Half Windsor knots.

Here’s how you can tie it the Pratt way:

  1. Unlike the previous tie knot, you should start this uncommon knot by draping it around the collar with the seam facing outwards.
  2. Adjust the length to make the wide end hanging about 2 to 3 inches lower than the desired final length.
  3. Make an “X” shape below your chin level by crossing the two ends where the small end is in front of the large one forming a loop around the neck.
  4. Hold the wide end up, and pass it through the neck loop.
  5. Pull the wide end all the way down then flip the tip ready for a horizontal move.
  6. Cross the wide end over the small end from the front while keeping a finger over the knot to create a tie loop.
  7. Pass the wide end through the loop around the neck from beneath.
  8. Hold the wide end tip, and pass it gently through the tie loop you’ve created earlier.
  9. Pull down the tip of the wide end with one hand to adjust the length of the tie while gently holding the necktie with the other hand.

How to Tie an Eldredge Knot

The Eldridge is one of the most unique looking ties that you can do yourself. It’s also relatively modern, as it was invented by Mr. Jeffrey Eldredge in 2007.

The knot is noticeably large when compared even to the big-sized knots like the Windsor. However, it has a tapered end and 4-layer triangular shape that will definitely show that you know a thing or two about tie knots!

It goes without saying that it has an extremely complex construction and requires a bit of trial and error to master. However, here’s a simple step by step guide that’ll walk you through every step of the way:

  1. Start by draping the tie with the seam facing inwards around the collar, and make sure the wide end is on the left while the narrow end is on the right.
  2. Adjust the length of the tie by resting the tip of the wide at an inch above your waistline. The length of the wide end should be exactly where you want it in the end.
  3. Unlike most knots, you’ll mostly use the small end here. So, keep that in mind.
  4. Bring the wide end to the center, and pinch it while crossing the two ends. The small end should be in front of the large one forming a loop around the neck.
  5. Hold the small end tip, and pass it across the wide end from the back.
  6. Move the small end tip up, and pass it through the loop around your collar.
  7. Move the small end down towards the other side.
  8. Once again, hold the small end, and cross the wide end from the front towards the right.
  9. Pass the small end up into the neck loop again from underneath the loop.
  10. Go down again with the small end tip towards the lower left.
  11. Cross the small end tip again towards the right side. But this time, from the back of the wide end, and keep this part loose to create the tie loop.
  12. Slowly pass the small end tip across the tie loop you’ve just created.
  13. Tighten the tie knot by pulling on the small tip.
  14. Pass the small end tip through the original collar loop from above. Then move down towards the left.
  15. Pass the small end tip though the original collar loop from the beneath then move up.
  16. Go down again through the neck loop and towards the right side.
  17. Cross the small end tip to the other side towards the loop you’ve just created.
  18. Pull the small end to tighten it again.
  19. Tuck the little remaining part of the small end tip inside the original collar loop.
  20. Adjust the triangular knot to be as flat and even as possible.

How to Tie a Trinity Tie

Another complex tie that is highly eye-catching and engraves a perfect imprint on everyone’s mind.

The modern knot is much smaller than the Eldredge while giving a similar elegant impression. Let’s see what the Trinity Knot is all about:

  1. Start by draping the tie with the seam facing inwards around the collar, and make sure the wide end is on the left while the narrow end is on the right.
  2. Adjust the length of the tie by resting the tip of the wide at an inch above your waistline. The length of the wide end should be exactly where you want it in the end.
  3. Cross the small end over the wide end making the “X”.
  4. Pass the small tip up the loop of the neck from beneath.
  5. Pull the small end down towards the lower left.
  6. Cross the small end to the right from behind the tie knot as horizontally as possible.
  7. Move the small end tip up towards the loop around the neck.
  8. Pass the small end tip through the neck loop from the front then down towards the lower left.
  9. Cross the small end tip over the wide end from the front horizontally from left to right.
  10. Bring the small end up towards the neck loop, and pass it from underneath. Don’t pull the small end all the way to create the tie loop.
  11. Pass the small end tip towards the tie loop you’ve just created, and keep the loop loose.
  12. Gently bring the small end tip from left to right horizontally from behind the knot while keeping the knot loose.
  13. Pass the small end upwards towards the loose loop, and pull all the way. The Trinity knot should show now.
  14. Tuck the little remaining part of the small end tip inside the original collar loop.
  15. Adjust the triangular collar as needed to make the 3 folds look as identical as possible.

How to Tie a Prince Albert Knot and Van Wijk Knot

The Van Wijk Knot has a remarkably cylindrical and tall shape, which gives it an unorthodox yet catchy appearance.

The Artist Lisa Van Wijk created the knot based on a previous style known as the “Prince Albert Knot”. This one has an extra crossing that creates a cylindrical effect.

If you want to tie a Prince Albert, you only should follow this guide but skip step 8:

  1. Drape the tie around your neck, and make the seam facing inwards around the collar.
  2. Make sure the wide end is on the right while the small end is on the left.
  3. Adjust the length to make the wide end hanging about 2 to 3 inches lower than the desired final length. Ideally, the small end should be an inch above the belly button.
  4. Make an “X” shape below your chin level by crossing the two ends where the large end is in front of the small one forming a loop around the neck.
  5. Wrap the wide end around the thin end from the behind, and cross the wide end from the right to left horizontally all the way.
  6. Cross the wide end again from the front of the small end horizontally from left to right.
  7. Pass the wide end over the small end from behind then again from the front. (You’re basically repeating steps 5 and 6 again).
  8. For a Van Wijk Knot, you need to repeat steps 5 and 6 for a third loop.
  9. Move the wide end tip up through the neck loop from underneath, and keep it loose to create the tie loop.
  10. Pass the wide end through the tie loop you’ve just created.
  11. Pull the wide end down all the way while holding the tie knot gently.
  12. Tighten the knot by pulling it up simultaneously then adjust it as needed.

How to Tie a Bow Tie

A bow tie is a necessary skill that every gentleman should know about. It’s beneficial for various occasions from formal tuxedos to intelligent looks on shirts.

Here’s a simple guide to wearing the bow tie correctly:

  1. Start by laying the bowtie around your collar with the seam facing inwards.
  2. Adjust the length of the bowtie to make the right side shorter than the left side.
  3. Cross the two ends to make the “X” shape where the right end is over the left end.
  4. Bring the longer side up through the neck loop from beneath, and leave this side as it is till we’re back to it shortly after.
  5. Hold the other end (the shorter end) towards the right, and fold it to the left to make the shape of a butterfly.
  6. Return to the longer end and bring down over the butterfly shape from the front exactly in the middle.
  7. Fold the longer end inwards while pinch-folding it in a bow shape.
  8. Pull the previous figure outwards to create a tie loop.
  9. Pass the other end through that loop to create a bow knot.
  10. Pull the folded wings to tighten the bow.
  11. Adjust the bow tie to be exactly in the middle.

Wrap Up

There you have it. A fully comprehensive guide that shows you how to tie a tie with full simple steps.

As you can see, there are tons of different tie knots out there. If you’re a beginner I recommend you start with the Simple knot or the Four-in-Hand.

However, if you’re looking for something a little extra, you can take the challenging yet highly rewarding Eldredge or Trinity knots!

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